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Statewide election dates

May 17, 2022: Primary
November 8, 2022: General election

note from editor: 

   I would encourage each and everyone to please do

your research on candidates this year for 2022. 

The voting information on local and national levels updates as we approach 2022 elections. I would encourage you to look on ballot pedia for the candidates on national levels for our state and federal below in addition to what we have listed.

Editors Note for Voice of Dunkard: We would highly encourage you to vote in person at your polling location. You can find your voting location above.. 
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Bud Cook (Republican Party) is a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, representing District 49. He assumed office on December 1, 2016. His current term ends on November 30, 2022.

Cook (Republican Party) is running for re-election to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives to represent District 50. He declared candidacy for the Republican primary scheduled on May 17, 2022. (note)Pam Snyder will be retiring and he is running for her position in our local 50th district. 

States are in the process of redistricting congressional and state legislative boundaries following the 2020 census. As a result, the district that Cook declared their candidacy for is subject to change and will be updated after the candidate filing deadline has passed and the official list of candidates becomes available.

Cook was a 2014 Republican candidate for District 49 of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives.

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The May 2022 primary has now conlcuded. Keep up the research and voting for good candidates for the November 2022 election. 

WE MUST SAVE AMERICA!

VOTE AT THE POLLS!!!!

See the Election Results for Greene County and local below: 

Doug Mastriano wins

the republican candidacy for Governor. He will go forward for the november run against Josh shapiro in November 2022. 

Also, Carrie Lewis DelRosso for Lieutenant Governor. 

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Are you tired of the policies you are seeing? Are you sick and tired of Broken Promises? 

Do you want election integrity and much more? Are you about America First Policies? Then VOTE! 

Election Integrity is at the forefront of why we must vote, to ensure that we have the right people in office. Biden is destroying America with his policies!  Our Elections were stolen in 2020 and it has been proven over and over and it is time we stood up and said, ENOUGH! 

GO VOTE! 

Redistricting following the 2020 census (source)Ballot Pedia

This section lists major events in the post-2020 census redistricting cycle in reverse chronological order. Major events include the release of apportionment data, the release of census population data, the introduction of formal map proposals, the enactment of new maps, and noteworthy court challenges. Click the dates below for additional information.

Below is a list of Pennsylvania elections covered by Ballotpedia in 2022. Click the links to learn more about each type: Checkmarks our elections coming up for 2022 May Primary and November General. 

(source)Ballot Pedia

U.S. Senate

U.S. House

Congress special election—

Governor

Other state executive

State Senate

State House

Special state legislative

State Supreme Court—

Intermediate appellate courts—

Local judges—

School boards—

Municipal government

Recalls—

Ballot measures—

Local ballot measures

Legend: ✓ election(s) / — no elections
Subject to Ballotpedia's scope

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U.S. House

See also: United States House elections in Pennsylvania, 2022 (May 17 Republican primaries)

The U.S. House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania are scheduled on November 8, 2022. Voters will elect 17 candidates to serve in the U.S. House from each of the state's 17 U.S. House districts.

District 1

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

District 2

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

 

District 3

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

District 4

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

District 5

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

District 6

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

 

Did not make the ballot:

 = candidate completed the Ballotpedia Candidate Connection survey.

District 7

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

 

Did not make the ballot:

  • Ryan Mackenzie

 = candidate completed the Ballotpedia Candidate Connection survey.

District 8

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

 

Did not make the ballot:

 

District 9

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

 

Did not make the ballot:

 = candidate completed the Ballotpedia Candidate Connection survey.

District 10

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

 

Did not make the ballot:

 = candidate completed the Ballotpedia Candidate Connection survey.

District 11

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

District 12

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

District 13

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

 

Did not make the ballot:

 

District 14

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

District 15

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

 = candidate completed the Ballotpedia Candidate Connection survey.

District 16

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

District 17

 Republican primary candidates

Note: The candidate list in this election may not be complete.

 

Did not make the ballot:

State court strikes down law extending absentee/mail-in voting eligibility to all voters

(source)Ballot pedia

On January 28, 2022, the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court struck down Act 77, which made absentee/mail-in voting available to all eligible electors, as a violation of the Pennsylvania Constitution. The court voted 3-2 on the matter, with Judges Mary Hannah LeavittPatricia McCullough, and Christine Fizzano Cannon (all Republicans) forming the majority and Judges Michael Wojcik and Ellen H. Ceisler (both Democrats) dissenting.[7]

As a result, and pending action by the state supreme court, absentee/mail-in voting eligibility in Pennsylvania is governed by Article VII, Section 14, of the state constitution, which extends eligibility to "qualified electors who may, on the occurrence of any election, be absent from the municipality of their residence, because their duties, occupation, or business require them to be elsewhere or who, on the occurrence of any election, are unable to attend at their proper polling places because of illness or physical disability or who will not attend a polling place because of the observance of a religious holiday or who cannot vote because of election day duties, in the case of a county employee."

The court's analysis

Leavitt, writing for the majority, analyzed Act 77 within the context of three pertinent provisions of the state constitution:[7]

  • Article VII, Section 1, of the Pennsylvania Constitution provides, in part, that a voter must have "resided in the election district where he or she shall offer to vote at least 60 days immediately preceding the election[.]" Leavitt said, "Our Supreme Court has specifically held that the phrase 'offer to vote' requires the physical presence of the elector, whose 'ballot cannot be sent by mail or express, nor can it be cast outside of all Pennsylvania election districts and certified into the county where the voter has his domicile.'" Leavitt added, "There is no air in this construction of 'offer to vote.' ... Our Supreme Court has further directed that before legislation 'be placed on our statute books' to allow qualified electors absent from their polling place on Election Day to vote by mail, 'an amendment to the Constitution must be adopted permitting this to be done."[7]

  • Article VII, Section 4 establishes that "all elections by the citizens shall be by ballot or by such other method as may be prescribed by law," provided "that secrecy in voting be preserved." Leavitt said, "To read Section 4 as an authorization for no-excuse mail-in voting is wrong for three reasons. First, no-excuse mail-in voting uses a paper ballot and not some 'other method.' Second, this reading unhooks Section 4 from the remainder of Article VII as well as its historical underpinnings. It ignores the in-person place requirement that was made part of our fundamental law in 1838. Third, it renders Article Vii, Section 14, surplusage."[7]

  • Article VII, Section 14, provides for absentee/mail-in voting, extending its availability to "qualified electors who may, on the occurrence of any election, be absent from the municipality of their residence, because their duties, occupation, or business require them to be elsewhere or who, on the occurrence of any election, are unable to attend at their proper polling places because of illness or physical disability or who will not attend a polling place because of the observance of a religious holiday or who cannot vote because of election day duties, in the case of a county employee." Leavitt wrote, "Section 14 can only be understood as an exception to the rule established in Article VII, Section 1, that a qualified elector must present herself at her proper polling place to vote on Election Day, unless she must 'be absent" on Election Day for the reasons specified in Article VII, Section 14(a)."[7]

Dissent

In a dissenting opinion, Wojcik disputed the majority's reading of Section 4 specifically: "[The] plain language of article VII, section 4 specifically empowers the General Assembly to provide a distinct method of casting a ballot for electors who are present in their municipality on a primary, general, or municipal election day by permitting the use of no-excuse mail-in ballots. This method is distinct from an elector’s appearance at his or her district of residence to cast a ballot as provided in article VII, section 1, either by paper ballot or by the use of a machine pursuant to article VII, section 6, or the use of an absentee ballot by an elector who is absent from his or her municipality on the day of a primary, general, or municipal election as provided in article VII, section 14."

Reactions

State Senate President Pro Tempore Jake Corman (R) said the following in a statement: "Today’s ruling should serve as a call to action to open up a serious conversation about the reforms necessary to make voting both accessible and secure for all Pennsylvanians. Governor Wolf has ignored this debate for over a year, but hopefully this ruling will help bring him to the table so we can address concerns about our election system once and for all. " State Sen. Doug Mastriano (R) approved of the ruling, saying, "I welcome the end of 'no-excuse' mail-in voting in Pennsylvania and I introduced legislation this session that does just that."[8][9]

Attorney General Josh Shapiro (D) said, "This opinion is based on twisted logic and faulty reasoning, and is wrong on the law. It will be immediately appealed and therefore won’t have any immediate impact on Pennsylvania’s upcoming elections."[10] Governor Tom Wolf (D) also criticized the ruling: "The strength of our democracy and our country depends on eligible voters casting their ballot and selecting their leaders. We need leaders to support removing more barriers to voting, not trying to silence the people."[11]

What are the voter ID laws in Pennsylvania?

See Voter identification laws by state.

How do I file to run for office?

See Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Pennsylvania for information on how to run for state or federal office.

What does Ballotpedia cover?

Ballotpedia's coverage extends to all elections on the federal level, all gubernatorial, state legislative, statewide ballot measure, and statewide judicial elections, as well as many other types of state executive offices. Local election coverage includes comprehensive ballot coverage for municipal and judicial elections in the top 100 cities by population and races for the large counties that overlap them. In the state capitals outside of the 100 largest cities, it includes coverage of mayoral, city council, and district attorney elections. It also includes school board elections in the top 200 largest school districts by enrollment, all California local ballot measures, and notable local ballot measures from across the nation. Ballotpedia also covers all elections in the U.S. territories but not elections in other countries.

How do I contact Ballotpedia with a question?

Email us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Editors Note: I would look below on information we have obtained from

Public resources on issues to voting in the state of Pennsylvania and other states. The choice is yours..

Note: Voting is right to every American Citizen and when issues do occur, it is reported and sometimes takes a while for the courts to make decisions in regards to those very issues that occur.

 

Much has been talked about regarding the issues with voting on state and national levels. As always, Information in regards to this can be very divided but the choice to consider all sides should be a right to every american.

 

We will provide you some information that has been officially documented or.. has been brought forth on these matters through other public media outlets: 

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